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Does driving on a gravel road damage your car in any way?

I drive on gravel road almost everyday, about 2 kilometres a day - will this hurt my car? 66 mths ago

Best Answer

2km HAHA, it will not hurt your car, it will hurt mine, I will give Collin Mcrae a go on a gravel road, World Rally Champoinship everytime, just drive slow and watch out for big stones, it will not do anything, it also depends on what condition the road is in, otherwise you can 120km o9n the road, I do it alot!

66 mths ago

Answers -

The stones from the road might hit your window and cause it to crack.

66 mths ago

Potentially, yes. Other than stones hitting windows, the rough surface could cause damage to the undercarriage and paintwork, and an increase in the (normal) amount of wear-and-tear.

66 mths ago

Nompi - not all cars are alike. 4x4 vehicles have much stronger suspension to deal with the vibration and the irregularities. Conventional cars generally won't break into pieces on these roads, but they will wear out faster than they would on tarred roads - particularly the suspension, drive-train and steering. Using a relatively soft tyre pressure will take some of the strain off your car, but will increase tyre wear and fuel consumption. But 2km isn't a great distance. My advice is to drive slowly on the gravel, and not to worry about it.

66 mths ago

Mink has given good advice. I was just going to say: "DUH!!?"

66 mths ago

Beware of lower tyre pressure. It might be more comfortable on the gravel, but it increases your chances of a puncture. Secondly, when you drive on tar with too low pressure, the sidewalls overheat due to more flexing and you increase the chance for a blowout. If its only 2km, just take it leisurely.

66 mths ago

Go slow Nompi go slow.

66 mths ago

Although well-constructed and graded gravel roads are suitable for speeds of 100 km/h (60 mph), driving on them requires far more attention to variations of the surface and it is easier to lose control than on a paved road. In addition to potholes, ruts and loose stony or sandy ridges at the edges or in the middle of the road, problems associated with driving on gravel roads include: * sharper and larger stones cutting and puncturing tires, or being thrown up by the wheels and damaging the underside, especially puncturing the fuel tank of unmodified cars * stones skipping up hitting the car body, lights or windshields when two vehicles pass * dust thrown up from a passing vehicle reducing visibility * 'washboard' corrugations cause loss of control or damage to vehicles * skidding on mud after rain * in higher rainfall areas, the increased camber required to drain water, and open drainage ditches at the sides of the road, often cause vehicles with a high centre of gravity, such as trucks and off-road vehicles, to overturn if they do not keep close to the crown of the road.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravel_road

66 mths ago

I would worry If I was driving with low profile tyres.

66 mths ago

2km is nothing to worry about,just take it easy thats all.Miceman Colin Mccrae was killed in a helicopter accident about a year ago.

66 mths ago

i hope not

66 mths ago

Driving in general damages your car, due to wear and tear on your engine and tyres. The only difference between a gravel road and a tar road, is that your car's shocks will take more of a beating (but they should be replaced from time to time with your services). The only other damage is rocks hitting your car and damaging your paint job (which isn't likely unless you drive behind another car). Therefore....no long term damage.

Source: My brain

66 mths ago

The roads I drive on daily are just as bad, and I think my suspension and shocks are sounding worse by the day.

66 mths ago

Yes it does. Your wheel aliment your shocks and if the road is not well maintained after rain the the pot holes. Just look at a farmers vehicles they are damaged from gravel roads.

66 mths ago

I used to have a little red Corsa. Took my parents....7 years ago to a place called Jacobsbaai on the West Coast. 6 kilometers "sinkplaat" road. Drove in and out about 8 times at 20 kl. per hour. Half of my car is still lying on that road. Never been back. Worse nightmare, and I loved that car so much. I felt so sorry for her.

Source: Alicia

66 mths ago

in a long run yes,but 2km aint bad u know.

66 mths ago

Low profile tyres are definitly a big NO NO on gravel roads.I use do drive a 100 km plus a day on gravel roads and always stay in the middle as far as possible and if the road hasnt been scrape for a long time stay in the paths of the road.I dont know if its good or bad advice but i also use do drive as fast as possible on bad corrugate roads,my point was that then i stay on top of the crown and the car dont vibrate as much.But in any case whats the difference between our gravel roads and tar roads?Its just the amount of dust.I have big up more damage on rims and tyres on S.A. bad tar roads than driven on gravel roads in Southwest.Best advice,drive according to road condition and slow down or rather stop if you spot a vehicle come from front and theres a lot loose stones on the road.

66 mths ago

More than driving on a non-gravel road, but you gotta do what you gotta do.

66 mths ago

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