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Where does the word THUG come from & what was its meaning?

60 mths ago

Best Answer

It comes from Hindi and means cunning, sly, fraudulent, dishonest or scoundrel.

60 mths ago

Answers -

Its originally from the Sanskrit word sthaga, meaning a thief or villain. In Confessions Of A Thug, written in 1837, Phillip Meadows described how the members of a band of Thugs specialised in different roles. There were the sothaees who lured travellers; the lughaees, who dug the graves in advance; and the bhuttotes, who killed. The victims were strangled with a scarf called a roomal. Although the book is fictional, Meadows based some of it on the evidence of a captured Thug called Ameer Ali.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/hinduism/history/thugs.shtml

60 mths ago

The direct sense of today's word applies to cold-blooded criminals, "While I was at the convenience store, two thugs came in and stole all the money and two packages of disposable diapers." Of course, the behavior is not limited to petty robbers: "Corporate executives who decimate their companies' finances and employee retirement funds are just white-collar thugs using corporate power instead of fire power." Suggested Usage: Since it was borrowed from Hindi, today's word has procreated a rather large family. The actions of a thug are "thuggery" and collectively they all belong to a thugdom. Their behavior is "thuggish," leaving them characterized by "thuggishness." Etymology: Hindi thag [têg] "a cheat, swindler" from Sanskrit sthagah "a cheat," the noun of the verb sthagati "he covers, conceals." Apparently, the meaning of Hindi "thag" derived from the concealment of cheats and swindlers. By the 19th century, however, the Hindi word referred to highway robbers of northern India, perhaps more appropriately called phansigars "stranglers," since they were known to strangle their victims to death after robbing them. The original Thugs were devotees of the goddess Kali, claiming that their victims were sacrifices to her. The Sanskrit verb is akin to English "thatch," which still covers many English houses, German Dach "roof," and Latin "toga," a type of body covering.

60 mths ago

Thuggery The English word "thug" is a truncation of 'thuggee'. It is one of many Indian words borrowed into English during the British colonial period. The English connotation of 'thug' is synonymous with terms like hoodlum and hooligan, indicating a person (or may or may not be anti-social) who harasses others, usually for hire. People regarded as thugs might commit assault (or 'menace'), battery, even robbery and grievous bodily harm, but they usually stop short of murder. Additionally, "thugs" usually travel in pairs, though they can work alone or in groups of four to six members, and are typically open about their presence (except to law enforcement officials); while "Thuggee" were covert and operated as members of a group, often called a "Thuggee cult" by the British. Hence, the word "Thuggee" is capitalised while the word "thug" usually is not; which enables distinction of a "Thug" (here, a short form of "Thuggee") from a "thug". In the heyday of Thuggee activity, travellers were typically part of a caravan group, so the term Thuggee typically referred to killing of a large number of people in a single operation. This aspect distinguishes Thuggee from similar concept of Dacoity, which means simple armed robbery. Dacoity has similarities with the terms brigand and bandit from European and Latin American experience, but there appear to be no exact Western parallels for Thuggee. Perhaps the closest concepts would be the format of piracy, though this is solely maritime robbery (usually with murder), and the earlier, but similar, format of raids on coastal settlements by Viking seafarers. Some aspects, however, are reminiscent of the Mafia group of organisations. Between them, these classes of criminal activity illustrate some of the mystique that attached to the Thugs and the complex mixture of fear and dread of these murderous Alpha predators that was felt by the ordinary people who might well be their potential victims. There is some question as to the extent of the religious dimension of Thuggee. Most contemporary sources described Thuggee as being a religious cult, but some modern sources feel it was merely a specialised form of organised crime or paramilitary activity, with no particular religious dimension beyond the normal piety of the villagers from whom its members were recruited.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thuggee

60 mths ago

A cutthroat or ruffian; a hoodlum. Comes from India

60 mths ago

Etymology----Hindi & Urdu t?hag, literally, thief. Dictionary definitions: a brutal ruffian or assassin : gangster , tough. Another old Indian word for thief was 'dacoit'. Dictionary definition---a rough, brutal hoodlum, gangster, robber, etc.; a brutal ruffian or assassin : gangster , tough Basically, a thief. Previously meant someone who stole with violence involved but as Bulldog says, it also includes thuggery by corporate thieves and governments who destroy people's lives with a smile and a designer suit -- hence this extreme of violent protest at the financial conference in Europe of all the great powers.

60 mths ago

Interesting

60 mths ago

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